How much Popular Support is There for the White Rights Movement’s Core Ideals? – Part 1: the Statistics

guess-attic-girl-woman-prettyWith all the publicity that White advocacy and the larger Alt-right have been getting lately, and with the immense popularity Donald Trump was able to garner from the general public while being labeled every anti-White slur in the book, and refusing to apologize for being White and speaking his mind or for rather openly courting the pro-White and alt-right vote, I think it is time to take another look at public opinions on ideals such as ours.

It’s of course too early yet for any large scale national surveys on the popularity of the alt-right or pro-White views. But there is plenty out there in already published work to shed light on public opinion relevant to our views. With the growing publicity, I imagine that the surveys and studies will start rolling out not to long from now.

Meanwhile, what I did find was the (apparently) very first Pew Research survey on the Alt-Right. It asked only about awareness and a general description:

A majority (54%) of U.S. adults say they have heard “nothing at all” about the “alt-right” movement and another 28% have heard only “a little” about it, according to a new Pew Research Center survey. Just 17% say they have heard “a lot” about the movement. . .

Among those who say they have heard “a lot” or “a little” about the alt-right, roughly a third (34%) associate the movement with “white supremacy” or “white nationalism.” That was the most common answer provided in an open-ended question asking respondents about their impressions of what the movement stands for, ahead of “racism” or “prejudice” (14%) and “extreme right-wing movement” (12%).

http://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2016/12/12/most-americans-havent-heard-of-the-alt-right/

Clearly, as much publicity as we have gotten already, we could use some more. Our enemies have heard more than our friends, and that’s not good either. Additionally, it is unfortunate that Pew lumped “White Nationalist” responses in with “White supremacy” responses. The two are distinct and it would certainly be useful to know which the public is largely associating the movement with.  While it is likely a good thing that a plurality of those with knowledge associate us with White identity issues, this also highlights that we will have to be constantly vigilant in explaining that White Nationalism and White identity politics in general are NOT White supremacy.

In my personal experience, many White conservatives in general seem to have no knowledge at all about what White Nationalism is, and sometimes assume that the label was made up by the left to shame White people who are civic nationalists. They are generally open to explanations from other conservative people, and we have a real opportunity here to define ourselves to the people we have the most realistic chance of winning over. We must not miss this opportunity. Now is the time to put this movement’s best foot forward.

The only other thing I could find was a survey of millennials only which found the following:

Nearly half of those surveyed, 45%, say they don’t know enough about the alt-right to have an opinion of it, compared with just 8% who say that of Black Lives Matter.

Among those who express an opinion, 34% say they have a favorable opinion of the alt-right, 21% an unfavorable one.

Among whites, the favorable-unfavorable divide is 33%-19%. Among African Americans, it is 31%-27%. Among Hispanics, 46%-23%. Among Asian Americans, 37%-23%.

http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/politics/onpolitics/2016/10/31/poll-millennials-black-lives-matter-alt-right/92999936/

Again, as much publicity as we’ve been getting, we could still benefit from more. The fact that favorable views outpace unfavorable ones is good, but it’s hard to get too excited about it since we can’t be sure it is not based on a misunderstanding of what we actually stand for, given knowledge about us seems to be so low in general. Crucially, this survey was taken in October of 2016, before “Hail gate” broke in late November. The Pew survey was taken in December—after the fiasco over the NPI conference.

The Measures:

As I stated here, the core ideals of the White Rights Movement (WRM), can be condensed into White identity advocacy + race-realism.

The first one can be broken down into two parts: (1) an attachment to White identity, and (2) support for advocating for White interests (however perceived). The second one should be measured using questions about the biological basis of race, and levels of support for notions of equality.

Additionally, I also listed five core positions that are widely accepted in the movement.

Several things to note:

  • Survey research can underestimate support for socially stigmatized or controversial positions (like ours) due to people not wanting to sound socially unacceptable.
  • This is survey research, so it asks people to verbally describe what they believe. It does not inquire into how they actually think, or what they actually do in practice. We are looking at public opinion here not public practice. That would have to be another post.
  • Most of these surveys were conducted in the United States.

Public Opinion and White Rights:

Here are some public opinion statistics relevant to us. I have grouped them under the core position of ours I think they are most relevant to.

The level of support that I classified them into, is as follows:

  • High = positions endorsed by anywhere from 61% – 100% of the study sample.
  • Moderate = positions endorsed by 35% – 60% of the study sample.
  • Low = positions endorsed by 15% – 34% of the study sample.
  • Negligible = positions endorsed by less than 15% of the study sample.

I will not comment on any of these statistics here in terms of interpreting them or what they actually mean for us. I will do that in a subsequent post.

Diversity and White Demographic Replacement [White Nationalism?]:

Support level = low to moderate.

2001: 27% of White Americans were “worried” that non-Whites were projected to be a majority in the country by the end of the century: 21% were “a little” worried and 6% were worried “a lot.”[1]

2016: a survey of 12 European countries asked the respondents if they agree with the statement “There are so many foreigners living round here, it doesn’t feel like home any more.” The highest responses came from countries that had received the largest numbers of immigrants: 52% agree in Italy, 47% agree in France, and 44% agree in Germany.[2]

2014: 19% of White Americans “opposed” or “strongly opposed” living in a neighborhood where half the neighbors were Black.[3]

White Racial Pride, Identity, and Interests:

Support level = moderate to high.

2013: 52% of White Americans say that it is either “very” or “extremely” important for “whites [to] work together to change laws that are unfair to whites.” 22% say that it is “moderately important”, 11% that it is “a little important”, and only 16% said that it was “not at all important”.[4]

2014: 42% of Whites say that they “feel closer” to other Whites than to Blacks.[5]

2013: 40% of White Americans say “being White” is “very” or “extremely” important to their identity. 28% say it is moderately important, and only 12% say it is only “a little important”, and 19% say it is “not at all important” to their identity. [6]

2006: 77% of White Americans agree that “their race has a distinct culture that should be preserved.”[7]

2008: Whites have consistently rated warmer feelings for other Whites than for Blacks on feeling thermometer questions. There has been a decrease in the difference over time, but that is due to Whites reporting cooler attitudes towards other Whites, not warmer attitudes towards Blacks. In 2008 Whites on average indicated that their attitudes towards other Whites were 7 points warmer than towards Blacks.[8]

2006: 74% of White Americans say that their own racial identity is important to them.[9]

2006: 38% of White Americans say that their own racial identity is “very important” to them.[10]

2011: 11% of Whites rated the prevalence of anti-White bias as a 10, on a score of 0 – 10. Only 2% of Whites in the same sample gave a rating of 10 to anti-Black bias.[11]

2011: On average, White respondents rated anti-White bias as more prevalent than anti-Black bias by 1 point on a 10 point scale.[12]

2001: 18% of Whites reported experiencing discrimination in the last decade of their lives because of their race.[13]

2016: 30% of Whites say they have been discriminated against because of their race.[14]

2016: 5% of Whites say that their race has made it “harder for them to succeed.”[15]

2013: 40% of Whites Americans say that it is “very” or “extremely” likely that “many whites are unable to find a job because employers are hiring minorities instead.” 23% say it is moderately likely, and 37% said it was either a little likely or not at all likely.[16]

“White Guilt”:

Support level = high

Surveys consistently show that large portions, not infrequently majorities or pluralities, of White Americans resist explanations of non-White circumstances that blame Whites. As just a few examples:

2016: 33% of Whites agreed that is was “no more difficult to be Black. . .than to be White,” and 24% agreed that White people did not benefit “at all” from advantages in society that Blacks did not have.[17]

2016: 64% of Whites did not choose “racial discrimination” as a “major reason that Blacks. . .may have a harder time getting ahead than Whites.”[18]

2016: Between 75% and 80% of White Americans do not believe that Blacks are treated “less fairly” when applying for loans, in the workforce, in restaurants, or when voting. 57% of Whites don’t believe Blacks are treated any “less fairly” by the court system, and an even break—50%—don’t believe Blacks are treated “less fairly” by the police.[19]

2016: 67% of Whites say that their race has either made it harder for them to succeed in life (5%) or hasn’t made much difference (62%).[20]

2016: 53% of Whites believe Blacks are no worse off financially than Whites.[21]

Concept of Race and Physical Equality:

Support level = moderate to high

2009: when asked whether race was “real” or “imagined” 75% of the study sample said it was real. 25% (49% of those who said race was real) of the sample said that “a person’s race(s) is determined by the way they look,” alone, and a further 11% (15% of those who said race was real) thought that race was determined by the way people look plus a person’s “traits/abilities,” and/or their “social ties to other people.” Thus, in all 36% of respondents (64% of those that said race was real) believed that race was at least partially defined by physical features.  10% (21% of those who said race was real) said that “a person’s race(s) is determined by their social ties” alone, and very small percentages gave other answers.[22]

*This was a mixed race sample, 64% White, but the authors stated that they analyzed the answers by race, and found no statistical difference. They also noted that a previous study had found Whites more likely to emphasize physical features, and Blacks more likely to emphasize culture when asked what determined race. In any case, it seems clear that a strong majority of Whites believe race is real, and probably a strong plurality if not majority believe race to be based wholly or at least partially on physical features.

2009: 86% of White Americans think genes play at least some role in intelligence, with 22% thinking it is completely controlled by genes to the exclusion of environment and personal choice. For math aptitude it is 77% with 18% attributing it to genetic factors only. Similarly, for athleticism: 81%, and 6%; for violence it is 64% and 2%; for nurturance it is 49%, and 2%; and for drive to succeed it is 49% and 1%.[23]

2006: When asked specifically how much genes explained differences between Blacks and Whites in “the drive to succeed, math ability, tendency to act violently, and intelligence” a White American sample responded: 50% said that genes were at least partially responsible for racial differences in these areas. 24% (50% of those who said genes had some influence) said genes had “very little” influence, 20% said genes had “some” influence, 6% said genes had “a lot” of influence, and less than 1% said that genes accounted for “just about all” of the differences. Thus, at least 25% of the White population thinks genes have between “some” and “a lot” of influence in explaining racial differences in these four areas.[24]

Discrimination and Social Equality:

Support level = low to negligible

There is very little on this. One of the reasons seems to be that this was the area targeted hardest and first by the anti-White left, and before the term “racist” was being applied to people who believed race was biological, it was being applied to people who believed in and supported social inequality and racial discrimination. As such the heaviest stigma is probably associated with this. We would expect therefore that Whites would be least likely to want to admit this in surveys. Indeed, part of the reason questions in this area seem to be rarely asked in the last two decades is that by no later than the 1990s, White support on surveys for statements such as “people of all races should attend the same schools,” was consistently over 90%. What this means for what White people actually believe is complicated but one thing is for sure: as far as survey research goes, they say they believe it.

Never the less, I did find this interesting statistic:

2014: 28% of White Southerners believe they should be able to discriminate in housing sales by race (i.e. they should be able to refuse to sell a house to Blacks because of race if they want to).[25]

That being said, my hunch is that Whites in particular are much more likely to approve of racial discrimination than they are willing to admit on surveys:

Krysan found in a 1995 study that when people were surveyed anonymously through the mail, they were more likely to express less favorable attitudes toward racial equality. “The more privacy you give a white person to express their attitudes, the less liberal they become,” she said.[26]

Additionally, 38% of Whites as late as 2002 agreed with the statement “Blacks shouldn’t push themselves where they’re not wanted.”[27]

Interracial Sex/Marriage:

Support level = low to moderate

2001: 46% of White Americans agree that “it is better to marry within one’s race.”[28]

2001: 44% of White Americans would be “bothered” if a close family member married a Black, and 9% would “not be able to accept it.” For marriage to a Hispanic: 33%, and 3% respectively. For marriage to an Asian: 29%, and 4%. Overall then, over a quarter (29%) would be “bothered” by any interracial marriage, and about 3-4% would “not be able to accept” any interracial marriage.[29]

2000: 21% of White people disapprove of a family member marrying a Hispanic or Asian, and 37% disapprove of a family member marrying a Black. Between a quarter and third (31%, 30%, and 23% respectively) explicitly say they approve.[30]

2012: 29% of Republican voters in Mississippi, and 21% of Republican voters in Alabama, agree that interracial marriage should be criminalized.[31]

*There is no guarantee that all of these respondents were White, however, most of them probably were.

2002: 10% of White Americans nationally do not oppose laws against interracial marriage.[32]

Other:

Support level = low to negligible

2001: 17% of White Americans agree that “children should be adopted only by people of their own race.”[33]

2010: 6% of White Southerners would not vote for a Black president.[34]

References:

[1] “Race and Ethnicity in 2001: Attitudes, Perceptions, and Experiences”, The Washington Post with the Keiser Family Foundation and Harvard University: http://files.kff.org/attachment/race-and-ethnicity-in-2001-attitudes-perceptions-topline

[2] Jacob Bojesson, “Poll: Half of Italians No Longer Feel at Home Because of Immigration,” The Daily Caller News Foundation, December 7, 2016: http://dailycaller.com/2016/12/07/poll-half-of-italians-no-longer-feel-at-home-because-of-immigration/?utm_campaign=atdailycaller&utm_source=Twitter&utm_medium=Social

[3] Maria Krysan and Sarah Patton Moberg, “Trends in Racial Attitudes,” Institute of Government and Public Affairs, University of Illinois: https://igpa.uillinois.edu/programs/racial-attitudes

[4] American National Election Studies, “White Racial Consciousness in the US: 2016 ANES Pilot Study Proposal,” 2016: http://www.electionstudies.org/onlinecommons/2016Pilot/WhiteConsciousness.pdf

[5] Maria Krysan and Sarah Patton Moberg, “Trends in Racial Attitudes,” Institute of Government and Public Affairs, University of Illinois: https://igpa.uillinois.edu/programs/racial-attitudes

[6] American National Election Studies, “White Racial Consciousness in the US: 2016 ANES Pilot Study Proposal,” 2016: http://www.electionstudies.org/onlinecommons/2016Pilot/WhiteConsciousness.pdf

[7] Jason Torkelson and Douglas Hartmann, “White Ethnicity in Twenty-First-Century America: Findings From a New National Survey, ” Ethnic and Racial Studies, 33:8, p. 1319 (11 digital): https://thesocietypages.org/files/2013/03/White-Ethnicity-in-Twenty-First-Century-America-Findings-from-a-New-National-Survey2.pdf

[8] Maria Krysan and Sarah Patton Moberg, “Trends in Racial Attitudes,” Institute of Government and Public Affairs, University of Illinois: https://igpa.uillinois.edu/programs/racial-attitudes

[9] Ibram Rogers, “Study Challenges Assumption That Whites Are Unaware of Their Privileges,” Diverse Issues in Higher Education, September 7, 2006: http://diverseeducation.com/article/6351/#

[10] Jason Torkelson and Douglas Hartmann, “White Ethnicity in Twenty-First-Century America: Findings From a New National Survey, ” Ethnic and Racial Studies, 33:8, p. 1319 (11 digital): https://thesocietypages.org/files/2013/03/White-Ethnicity-in-Twenty-First-Century-America-Findings-from-a-New-National-Survey2.pdf

[11] “Whites Believe They are Victims of Racism More Often than Blacks,” Tufts University, May 23, 2011: http://now.tufts.edu/news-releases/whites-believe-they-are-victims-racism-more-o

[12] “Whites Believe They are Victims of Racism More Often than Blacks,” Tufts University, May 23, 2011: http://now.tufts.edu/news-releases/whites-believe-they-are-victims-racism-more-o

[13] “Race and Ethnicity in 2001: Attitudes, Perceptions, and Experiences”, The Washington Post with the Keiser Family Foundation and Harvard University: http://files.kff.org/attachment/race-and-ethnicity-in-2001-attitudes-perceptions-topline

[14] “On Views of Race and Inequality, Blacks and Whites are Worlds Apart,” Pew Research Center, June 27, 2016: http://www.pewsocialtrends.org/2016/06/27/on-views-of-race-and-inequality-blacks-and-whites-are-worlds-apart/

[15] “On Views of Race and Inequality, Blacks and Whites are Worlds Apart,” Pew Research Center, June 27, 2016: http://www.pewsocialtrends.org/2016/06/27/on-views-of-race-and-inequality-blacks-and-whites-are-worlds-apart/

[16] American National Election Studies, “White Racial Consciousness in the US: 2016 ANES Pilot Study Proposal,” 2016: http://www.electionstudies.org/onlinecommons/2016Pilot/WhiteConsciousness.pdf

[17] Shiva Maniam, “Sharp Differences Over Who is Hurt, Helped by Their Race,” Pew Research Center, June 18, 2016: http://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2016/07/18/sharp-differences-over-who-is-hurt-helped-by-their-race/

[18] “On Views of Race and Inequality, Blacks and Whites are Worlds Apart,” Pew Research Center, June 27, 2016: http://www.pewsocialtrends.org/2016/06/27/on-views-of-race-and-inequality-blacks-and-whites-are-worlds-apart/

[19] “3. Discrimination and Racial Inequality,” Pew Research Center, June 27, 2016: http://www.pewsocialtrends.org/2016/06/27/3-discrimination-and-racial-inequality/

[20] “5. Personal Experiences With Discrimination,” Pew Research Center, June 27, 2016: http://www.pewsocialtrends.org/2016/06/27/5-personal-experiences-with-discrimination/

[21] “6. Views of Community, Family Life, and Personal Finances,” Pew Research Center, June 27, 2016: http://www.pewsocialtrends.org/2016/06/27/6-views-of-community-family-life-and-personal-finances/

[22] Julie Shulman and Joshua Glasgow, “Is Race Thinking Biological or Social, and Does It Matter for Racism? An Exploratory Study,” Journal of Social Philosophy, 41:3 (2010): http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1467-9833.2010.01497.x/full

[23] Toby Epstein Jayaratne, et al, “The Perennial Debate: Nature, Nurture, or Choice? Black and White American’s Explanations for Individual Differences,” Review of General Psychology, 13:1 (2009): https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2805246/

[24] Toby Epstein Jayaratne, et al, “White American’s Genetic Lay Theories of Racial Differences and Sexual Orientation: Their Relationship With Prejudice Towards Blacks, and Gay Men and Lesbians,” Group Processes & Intergroup Relations, 9:1 (2006): https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3832063/

[25] Anna Maria Barry-Jester, “Attitudes Toward Racism and Inequality are Shifting,” FiveThirtyEight.com, June 23, 2015: http://fivethirtyeight.com/datalab/attitudes-toward-racism-and-inequality-are-shifting/

[26] Anna Maria Barry-Jester, “Attitudes Toward Racism and Inequality are Shifting,” FiveThirtyEight.com, June 23, 2015: http://fivethirtyeight.com/datalab/attitudes-toward-racism-and-inequality-are-shifting/

[27] Maria Krysan and Sarah Patton Moberg, “Trends in Racial Attitudes,” Institute of Government and Public Affairs, University of Illinois: https://igpa.uillinois.edu/programs/racial-attitudes

[28] “Race and Ethnicity in 2001: Attitudes, Perceptions, and Experiences”, The Washington Post with the Keiser Family Foundation and Harvard University: http://files.kff.org/attachment/race-and-ethnicity-in-2001-attitudes-perceptions-topline

[29] “Race and Ethnicity in 2001: Attitudes, Perceptions, and Experiences”, The Washington Post with the Keiser Family Foundation and Harvard University: http://files.kff.org/attachment/race-and-ethnicity-in-2001-attitudes-perceptions-topline

[30] 2000 General Social Survey, citied in Ewa Golebiowska, “The Contours and Etiology of Whites’ Attitudes Toward Black-White Interracial Marriage,” Journal of Black Studies, 38:2 (2007), p. 6: http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/0021934705285961

[31] “Interracial Marriage: Many Deep South Republican Voters Believe Interracial Marriage Should be Illegal,” The Huffington Post, March 12, 2012: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/03/12/interracial-marriage-deep-south_n_1339827.html

[32] Maria Krysan and Sarah Patton Moberg, “Trends in Racial Attitudes,” Institute of Government and Public Affairs, University of Illinois: https://igpa.uillinois.edu/programs/racial-attitudes

[33] “Race and Ethnicity in 2001: Attitudes, Perceptions, and Experiences”, The Washington Post with the Keiser Family Foundation and Harvard University: http://files.kff.org/attachment/race-and-ethnicity-in-2001-attitudes-perceptions-topline

[34] Anna Maria Barry-Jester, “Attitudes Toward Racism and Inequality are Shifting,” FiveThirtyEight.com, June 23, 2015: http://fivethirtyeight.com/datalab/attitudes-toward-racism-and-inequality-are-shifting/

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